FAQ

Have a question about Study in abroad? We’ve got you covered with FAQs

Foreign universities are having their major intakes in September and January, they also have minor intakes in November, March, April, May, June and July. Hence, you should initiate steps for admission process at least six months in advance for the respective intake.

It depends on the length and type of program you will be attending. Your eligibility to work will be shown on the immigration stamp in your passport. International students are allowed to work for 20 hours per week during term days and full time during holidays.

Every University has its set of eligibility criteria which mostly includes minimum academic requirements, English language, relevant work experience etc. Your education counsellor can help you identify relevant programs as per your profile.

Sandwich programs are made-up of a combination of periods of study and time spent in Industry. The course duration extends to 4-years instead of the usual 3-years, for all bachelors courses. Foundation programs are of a 1-year length and are tailored for students as an alternative route to bridge between their qualification and that, which is required for entry into a degree program at the International University or College.

Student visas can be obtained given proper documentation. Most of the applicants from India who provide a confirmed offer from a University/College abroad and evidence of financial support for tuition fees and living costs are issued visas.

Entry requirements vary widely between universities and between countries, so are sure to check the information provided by your prospective university before submitting anything. For non-native English speakers wanting to study in English-speaking countries, it is also highly likely that you’ll need to provide proof of your English-language proficiency by taking an English-language test such as TOEFL or IELTS. Similar tests may be required for those studying in other languages.

Study abroad scholarships can be found in many places. Your first port of call will be the website of your chosen university, where you’ll find information on available scholarships. Sometimes the university will also list external scholarships, such as those offered by the government or business partners of the school. If not, you should research governmental schemes in your home country and your country of study, as well as funding offered by external organizations relating to your field of study.

If your chosen university has readily available campus accommodation, it is likely that you will be able to apply for a place in these student halls. If this is not the case, you will need to find your own accommodation. If money is no object, you can consider renting your own flat, while those on a smaller budget can find shared accommodation with other students or use spare room listings found online. In all cases, you should make sure you do your research before signing anything or handing over any money. Your university’s student support team and student union should also offer advice on how to find accommodation locally.